Category Archives: News

Health Line in the News

As a supplement to my comparison of journey times between Leipzig-Dresden and Cleveland’s east suburbs and Downtown I thought I’d highlight a recent, fairly comprehensive blog post from CEOs for Cities regarding public transit and transit-oriented development in Cleveland.

Cleveland RTA Health Line

photo courtesy ITDP via D.C. Streetsblog

CEOs for Cities focuses on the Health Line as a good example of bus rapid transit (BRT) and catalyst for transit-oriented development along the Euclid Avenue corridor. I have to admit to being skeptical of the Health Line in the beginning, mostly because I tend to think of bus rapid transit more as a system rather than just one line but I think the Health Line is a good start and, having ridden it, I’m a little less of a skeptic. Continue reading

The Art of Rational Decision-Making

Economics is generally based on the assumption that people are able to make rational decisions based on weighing all the costs and benefits of something. An individual may take into account things like fixed costs and variable costs. There are opportunity costs. For example, if I decide to go to a concert instead of study for an exam then I probably think that the benefit I get out of going to that concert outweighs the costs of getting a poor grade on the exam. But what if there are costs that I don’t factor into my decision-making? Am I still making a rational choice based on the information available to me? Or am I choosing to ignore certain costs because they’re too abstract or too difficult to quantify?

Very often this kind of problem is the result of external costs, those costs that one doesn’t consider when making decisions, as opposed to internal costs or out-of-pocket costs. Continue reading

Does Germany Have All the Answers?

The European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) has an article from the beginning of January that I’d like to highlight. The article is entitled “Cycling Solutions: Why Germany Has All The Answers” and while I think that may be a bit of an exaggeration, Germany really is an interesting case study for U.S. cycling advocates and transportation planners. Buehler, Pucher, Merom und Bauman (2011) compared active travel (pdf) in the United States and Germany. In their introduction they list off a number of reasons why the comparison is so appropriate: market economies, democratic systems of government, high rates of auto ownership, similar proportions of licensed drivers and, importantly, similar design and timing of travel surveys. The general conclusion of their research was Continue reading

Heated Bicycle Paths

An engineering firm in the Netherlands is currently working on a method for heating bicycle paths in winter so that they remain free of snow and ridable. The municipalities of Zutphen and Utrecht, among others, are considering building such paths in the future.

The first test run of an environmentally friendly means of heating a bicycle path using ground water was Continue reading